The Broadway Musical Blog – Musical theater news and gossip from the Great White Way

Dishing out daily (or almost daily) Broadway musical news and gossip. The companion site to The Broadway Musical Home (broadwaymusicalhome.com), a directory of Broadway musicals with the story, songs, merchandise, video clips, lyrics, tickets, rights & awards for almost 200 shows.

The Reviews for Side Show are In…

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The reviews for the revival of Side Show are in, and the critics agree that this production is at least twice as compelling as the 1997 original.  As the title gives away, the story features sideshow freaks, including attached twins Violet and Daisy.  Though the world of Side Show can be grungy and vile in more ways than one, the final message is touching and reflective of the experience we all face as humans.  The production quality is stellar (the makeup design of the sideshow freaks is particularly convincing) and the performances are impressive, especially those from Erin Davie and Emily Padgett as the twins.  Those successes combine to somewhat counter the production’s weaknesses and, in the end, deliver a totally revamped Side Show that’s emotional and delightful at once.

NEW YORK TIMES REVIEW

“Being a freak is virtually the new normal, so the timing couldn’t be better for the thrilling Broadway revival of Side Show that blazed open Monday night at the St. James Theater. The musical by Bill Russell and Henry Krieger, about conjoined twins searching for love and fame, or maybe just a half-measure of…”

READ THE FULL REVIEW

TIME OUT NEW YORK REVIEW

“When Side Show opened in 1997 for a brief Broadway run, the American musical was in crisis and the show seemed, to some, like a lifeline. If period-Americana tuners about unusual women in conformist worlds were your ball game, then here was a real double-header: the story of Daisy and Violet Hilton, conjoined twi…”

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NEW YORK DAILY NEWS REVIEW

“For a musical about true-life conjoined twins Daisy and Violet Hilton, the strange and stirring Side Show has a nagging habit of losing its grip. Chalk it up to dramatic inconsistencies and thin characterizations.  Even so, there’s a lot to like about the revised vision of this Depression-era biograp…”

READ THE REVIEW

HOLLYWOOD REPORTER REVIEW

“While the commercially disastrous 1997 Broadway run of Side Show generated a substantial cult following, the big surprise for those of us coming to it fresh is that its exotic subject matter — real-life conjoined twin sisters who became fixtures on the 1930s vaudeville circuit — adheres so naturally to the central th…”

READ THE REVIEW

ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY REVIEW

“If ever there was a show that defines the phrase ‘cult musical’, it’s Side Show. Apologies to Chess, Follies, and that telekinetic favorite Carrie. In the 17 years since its premiere, the Bill Russell and Henry Krieger labor of love inspired by the true-life tale of the Hilton sisters—conjoined twins–turned–vau…”

READ THE REVIEW

The Reviews for The Last Ship are In…

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The reviews for The Last Ship are in, and while this dramatic musical may leave you with a rousing, working-man’s ballad in your brain, it may also leave you struggling to describe the plot to your friends.  The new musical, featuring songs by Sting, transports audiences to a once-great shipbuilding town in northern England.  The scenery and effects create a bleak environment that epitomizes the attitude of the frustrated townspeople – matching the fervor with which the cast struggles.  The problem isn’t the music or direction or choreography or scenery, though – it’s the story.  With numerous characters playing major roles and questionable and/or predictable plot machinations peppered throughout, it’s easy to fill disengaged.  The musical is certainly unique on Broadway right now and the capable cast certainly conveys the story with conviction, but with an underachieved storyline, it’s a bit tough to wholly recommend The Last Ship.

 

NEW YORK TIMES REVIEW

“Hard times, blighted lives and the bleak humor that occasionally lifts the fog: The universe of The Last Ship, the new musical with a score by Sting about a shipbuilding town in decline, lies at some distance from its peppier neighbors on Broadway, where megaphoned uplift and easy escapism tend to thrive. For that rea…”

READ THE REVIEW

 

TIME OUT NEW YORK REVIEW

“To use shipbuilding as an analogy for crafting musicals, the songs are the hull—the most visible part of the thing, taking up the most space. But you won’t sail far without a strong, even keel, the beam around which the hull is constructed—the book, in other words. With The Last Ship, a fervent, rollicking…”

READ THE REVIEW

 

ASSOCIATED PRESS REVIEW

“You may be tempted upon leaving Sting’s Broadway musical The Last Ship to head straight to a pub to drain a pint and sing some sea shanties. Or maybe go weld something. Or do both. Such are the foot-stomping, testosterone-filled feelings that emerge from the Neil Simon Theatre, where a blast of British working…”

READ THE REVIEW

 

ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY REVIEW

“The biggest selling point of The Last Ship is also its greatest stumbling block: multiple Grammy winner and Tantra enthusiast Sting, who provides the music and lyrics to his first-ever Broadway show. Fans hoping for the same pop sensibility that turned ”I’ll Be Watching You” and ”Desert Rose” into hits wil…”

READ THE REVIEW

 

HOLLYWOOD REPORTER REVIEW

“He may not appear onstage, but there’s no mistaking the voice of Sting in both wistful balladeer and rousing reveler modes in his stirring score for The Last Ship. Set against the demise of the shipyards in the composer’s hometown of Wallsend in North East England, this melancholy musical is without doubt…”

READ THE REVIEW

 

NBC NEW YORK REVIEW

“Submerged beneath an often told prodigal-son story is a haunting, gorgeously executed and involving musical that marks the debut of a new Broadway composer—Sting. The British songwriter was inspired by his own childhood in writing The Last Ship, about a group of U.K. ship builders whose livelihoods are threatened by the c…”

READ THE REVIEW

The Reviews for On the Town are in…

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The reviews for On the Town are in, and the critics agree that this is one helluva revival!  Director John Rando has created a fresh, fun, and bouncy New York that only appears in the eyes of excited newcomers and the dreams of long-time citizens — it’s the American capital of opportunity.  Choreography by Joshua Bergasse matches the aesthetic, creating a wholesome, exciting magic that spreads to every seat in the Lyric Theater.  Of course it doesn’t hurt that the stars of the show deliver serious star performances – Tony Yazbeck is a dazzling lead sailor and Megan Fairchild, of the New York City Ballet, is captivating as the owner of his heart.  On the Town offers a night of delightful (and harmless) skirt-chasing and takes you to the New York you dreamed about as a child.

NEW YORK TIMES

“And now, a show about sex that you can take the whole family to: the kids, the grandparents, even your sister the nun. That idea may sound kind of creepy, or (worse) dreary. But I assure you that the jubilant revival of On the Town, which opened Thursday night at the Lyric Theater, is anything but. On the cont…”

Read the Full Review

NEW YORK DAILY NEWS

“Three footloose sailors aren’t the only ones who get lucky in On the Town. The audience does, too. Director John Rando has assembled a great cast for this fizzy and frisky revival of the 1944 musical by Betty Comden, Adolph Green and Leonard Bernstein. Tracing a tale of World War II tars on leave in the bi…”

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ASSOCIATED PRESS

“The webs have been swept away, the comic book villains are long gone and even the name of the theater has changed. So what better way to bid farewell to the doomed Spider-Man musical at the re-christened Lyric Theatre than with a pure American classic? An exuberant, dazzling revival of On the Town…”

Read the Full Review

HOLLYWOOD REPORTER

“A glorious 28-piece orchestra playing “The Star-Spangled Banner” in front of a giant American flag safety curtain has the audience on its feet before On the Town gets started. But it’s the jagged blasts of brass, the languorously bluesy romantic ballads and the exuberant comedy numbers of Leonard Bernstein’s jazzy…”

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NBC NEW YORK

“Living in New York City, day in and day out, it’s easy to forget the fun of experiencing it all for the first time. The wonder of looking up at the skyscrapers from the streets below. The excitement of being among the diversity of its residents. It’s the sort of childlike discovery that makes even a crowded subway seem…”

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The Reviews for Holler If You Hear Me are In…

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The reviews for Holler If You Hear Me are in, and unfortunately the critics don’t think anyone will holler for this new jukebox musical based on songs of the late rapper Tupac Shakur.  The critics almost universally recognize the power of Tupac’s lyrics and the strength of the song performances, but they can’t get past the poor story and over-emphasized presentation.  Recent Tony-winning director Kenny Leon leads the charge and seemingly isn’t confident that the public can pick up on the themes of the story.  The result is an “overwrought” and “well-intentioned but toothless” musical about life on the streets, violence, hard knocks, and second chances.  Critics believe that it may leave fans of Tupac unsatisfied and fans of Broadway wondering “…why?”.  It’s true that Broadway is due for a hip-hop musical that will set the industry ablaze, but unfortunately Holler If You Hear Me doesn’t seem to be the one.

NEW YORK TIMES

“The beats are sweet, and the words often have an electric charge in Holler if Ya Hear Me, a new Broadway musical inspired by the lyrics of the popular but troubled rapper Tupac Shakur, who was shot and killed at 25 in Las Vegas in 1996. Unfortunately, much else about this ambitious show, which opened on Thursday at the Palace Theater, feels heartfelt but heavy-handed, as it punches home its message with a relentlessness that may soon leave you numb to the tragic story it’s trying to tell. Written by Todd Kreidler and directed by Kenny Leon, a Tony winner this year for the revival of A Raisin in the Sun, the show admirably yanks the jukebox musical, which has mostly been mired in the hit parade of the baby-boomer years, into the last decade of the 20th century. It was then that Shakur’s raw, propulsive music struck a powerful chord, especially among disaffected black (and white) youth living in poverty amid explosive violence, while America was supposedly firing on all economic cylinders.”

Read the Full Review

NBC NEW YORK

“It’s a safe bet that a swath of theatergoers has steered clear of hip-hop—at least, the kind not scripted by In the Heights composer Lin-Manuel Miranda—because it’s gritty, racy and has a perception problem in some quarters. If that’s you, then Holler If Ya Hear Me, the Broadway musical “inspired by” the lyrics of Tupac Shakur, is a chance to correct a grave omission. If, however, you’ve been on the Tupac train all along, then Holler, which has just opened at The Palace Theatre, is a banner opportunity to stand in awe of a rich canon that, it’s difficult to grasp, originated with a man who died at only 25.”

Read the Full Review

TIME OUT NEW YORK

“In theory, hip-hop ought to have a bigger presence in mainstream music-theater by now: Broadway showstoppers have never been short on rhyme, syncopation or populist sentiment. Practice is a different matter. While there have been rap-rich musicals (In the Heights), the fusion of hip-hop and razzle-dazzle has been tricky at best, tacky at worst. The latest attempt is Holler if Ya Hear Me, a ghetto-not-so-fabulous repurposing of songs by Tupac Shakur (1971–96) for a ramshackle morality tale about revenge and second chances.”

Read the Full Review

ASSOCIATED PRESS

“Broadway has had a punk jukebox musical with Green Day songs and one featuring harmonies by Frankie Valli and the Four Seasons. There’s a jukebox show with Abba songs and a new Carole King one. Now it’s time for rap. Holler If Ya Hear Me is the intriguing musical inspired by songs by Tupac Shakur, one of hip-hop’s greatest artists who wrote about the ugly life in the drug-fueled mean streets before dying of gunshot wounds in 1996. The high-energy, deeply felt but ultimately overwrought production opened Thursday in a blaze of N-words at the Palace Theatre, proving both that rap deserves its moment to shine on a Broadway stage and that some 20 Shakur songs can somehow survive the transformation — barely.”

Read the Full Review

HOLLYWOOD REPORTER

“John Singleton can relax. Any danger of his long-in-development Tupac Shakur biopic being beaten to the punch by Holler If Ya Hear Me is quickly dispelled by the deflating experience of this well-intentioned but toothless Broadway rap musical. The show is not a biographical drama but a story of friendship and family, gun violence, racism and redemption in an inner-city black neighborhood, inspired by Shakur’s lyrics and poetry. However, therein lies the problem. The music is often powerful and the performers uniformly capable, but the songs are a poor fit for narrative presentation, at least in writer Todd Kreidler’s cut-and-paste of cliched situations and stock characters.”

Read the Full Review

A new way to buy Broadway tickets online

ScoreBig

We all know that there are LOTS of ways to buy Broadway tickets (and it’s easy to be skeptical of the new kid on the block), but we recently tested out a new (to us and to Broadway) tickets website called ScoreBig that offers a bit of a different approach to the Broadway ticket-buying process.

It’s almost like an online version of the TKTS booth, where discounted tickets are made available to people hoping to see a show for less.  The twist with ScoreBig is that you have the opportunity to make an offer on tickets and get them for an even lower price.  The other twist with ScoreBig is that the seat selection process is streamlined – instead of looking up actual open seats, ScoreBig outlines different seating areas with similar views and prices (in a theatre there may be 6 or 7 seating areas to choose from).  The guarantee with the seats is that your tickets will “always be together – which means in a row, one next to the other, without any strangers seated in between”.

So…how did ScoreBig do when we tested the system out? Pretty well overall!

The process on the website was easy – we found the show we wanted to see (in this case the hilarious A Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder), picked a seating area we liked (and yes, our two seats ended up being right next to each other), and then started making offers.  To really test the system, we started with some low-ball offers, and that’s where the first complication popped up.  You input the amount you’re willing to spend per ticket, and ScoreBig instantly reviews to see if that will work – if your offer is rejected after three attempts, you’ve got to wait 24 hours before making another offer on tickets in that seating area.  They’re clear about the policy, so it’s no surprise (and there’s even a cool colored bar that instantly shows how likely your offer is to be accepted), it just means you’ll want to make serious offers to save the most time.

Where we see this being especially useful is for people who have a specific amount of money set aside to see a Broadway show.  There are no fees or extra charges with ScoreBig, so feel free to make an offer all the way up to the top of your budget.  Having the option to make an offer lets you find your tickets fast and skip the search through all the different sections.

The only other complication we experienced with ScoreBig was the actual acquisition of the tickets.  For us, there was an option to have the tickets waiting at Will Call or to download them for printing at home.  We chose to download and didn’t receive the link to do so until a couple days after purchase.  We assume that logistics were being worked out and seats were being secured behind the scenes during those two days, but it made us a little nervous (because the performance date was coming up soon).  In the end, we got the tickets just fine.  Our recommendation is to give ScoreBig a try if you’ve got at least a few days or maybe even a week before your show…otherwise maybe visit the TKTS booth instead.

Based on our test experience, we would use ScoreBig again.  Like we said before, it’s kind of like buying TKTS discount tickets online (and avoiding that sometimes absurdly long line).  It could be really helpful for people planning a trip to the city or looking for tickets on a specific date or just looking for the cheapest possible tickets!  Give it a try yourself and let us know what you think.  It’s certainly easy to use and offers some cool advantages that you might not find from other Broadway ticket sellers.

The Broadway Musical Home received a discount coupon code for ScoreBig but was not paid to endorse ScoreBig services and/or offerings in any way.

AWARDS SEASON 2014: Tony Award Winners

2014 Tony Awards - Show

It finally came and went - the end to an exciting awards season – and the big trophies everyone was hoping to snag.

Thank you once again for joining us as we live updated! Until next year…

Here’s the full list of nominees. Winners are marked by a winner.

Best Musical
After Midnight
Aladdin
Beautiful – The Carole King Musical
winnerA Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder

Best Play
Act One
winnerAll the Way
Casa Valentina
Mothers and Sons
Outside Mullingar

Best Revival of a Musical
winnerHedwig and the Angry Inch
Les Miserables
Violet

Best Revival of a Play
The Cripple of Inishmaan
The Glass Menagerie
winnerA Raisin in the Sun
Twelfth Night

Best Performance by an Actor in a Leading Role in a Musical
winnerNeil Patrick Harris, Hedwig and the Angry Inch
Ramin Karimloo, Les Miserables
Andy Karl, Rocky
Jefferson Mays, A Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder
Bryce Pinkham, A Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder

Best Performance by an Actress in a Leading Role in a Musical
Mary Bridget Davies, A Night with Janis Joplin
Sutton Foster, Violet
Idina Menzel, If/Then
winnerJesse Mueller, Beautiful – The Carole King Musical
Kelly O’Hara, The Bridges of Madison County

Best Performance by an Actor in a Leading Role in a Play
Samuel Barnett, Twelfth Night
winnerBryan Cranston, All the Way
Chris O’Dowd, Of Mice and Men
Mark Rylance, Richard III
Tony Shalhoub, Act One

Best Performance by an Actress in a Leading Role in a Play
Tyne Daly, Mothers and Sons
LaTanya Richardson Jackson, A Raisin in the Sun
Cherry Jones, The Glass Menagerie
winnerAudra McDonald, Lady Day at Emerson’s Bar & Grill
Estelle Parsons, The Velocity of Autumn

Best Performance by an Actor in a Featured Role in a Musical
Danny Burstein, Cabaret
Nick Cordero, Bullets Over Broadway
Joshua Henry, Violet
winnerJames Monroe Iglehart, Aladdin
Jarrod Spector, Beautiful – The Carole King Musical

Best Performance by an Actress in a Featured Role in a Musical
Linda Emond, Cabaret
winnerLena Hall, Hedwig and the Angry Inch
Anika Larsen, Beautiful – The Carole King Musical
Adriane Lenox, After Midnight
Lauren Worsham, A Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder

Best Performance by an Actor in a Featured Role in a Play
Reed Birney, Casa Valentina
Paul Chahidi, Twelfth Night
Stephen Fry, Twelfth Night
winnerMark Rylance, Twelfth Night
Brian J. Smith, The Glass Menagerie

Best Performance by an Actress in a Featured Role in a Play
Sarah Greene, The Cripple of Inishmaan
Celia Keenan-Bolger, The Glass Menagerie
winnerSophie Okonedo, A Raisin in the Sun
Anika Noni Rose, A Raisin in the Sun
Mare Winningham, Casa Valentina

Best Book of a Musical
Chad Beguelin, Aladdin
Douglas McGrath, Beautiful – The Carole King Musical
Woody Allen, Bullets Over Broadway
winnerRobert L. Friedman, A Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder

Best Original Score (Music and/or Lyrics) Written for the Theater
Aladdin (Music: Alan Menkin; Lyrics: Howard Ashman, Tim Rice and Chad Begeulin)
winnerThe Bridges of Madison County (Music & Lyrics: Jason Robert Brown)
A Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder (Music: Steven Lutvak; Lyrics: Robert L. Freedman and Steven Lutvak)
If/Then (Music: Tom Kitt; Lyrics: Brian Yorkey)

Best Choreography
winnerWarren Carlyle, After Midnight
Steven Hoggett and Kelly Devine, Rocky
Casey Nicholaw, Aladdin
Susan Stroman, Bullets Over Broadway

Best Orchestrations
Doug Besterman, Bullets Over Broadway
winnerJason Robert Brown, The Bridges of Madison County
Steve Sidwell, Beautiful – The Carole King Musical
Jonathan Tunick, A Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder

Best Scenic Design of a Play
winnerBeowulf Boritt, Act One
Bob Crowley, The Glass Menagerie
Es Devlin, Machinal
Christopher Oram, The Cripple of Inishmaan

Best Scenic Design of a Musical
winnerChristopher Barreca, Rocky
Julian Crouch, Hedwig and the Angry Inch
Alexander Dodge, A Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder
Santo Loquasto, Bullets Over Broadway

Best Costume Design of a Play
Jane Greenwood, Act One
Michael Krass, Machinal
Rita Ryack, Casa Valentina
winnerJenny Tiramani, Twelfth Night

Best Costume Design of a Musical
winnerLinda Cho, A Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder
William Ivey Long, Bullets Over Broadway
Arianne Philips, Hedwig and the Angry Inch
Isabel Toledo, After Midnight

Best Sound Design of a Play
Alex Baranowski, The Cripple of Inishmaan
winnerSteve Canyon Kennedy, Lady Day at Emerson’s Bar & Grill
Dan Moses Schreier, Act One
Matt Tierney, Machinal

Best Sound Design of a Musical
Peter Hylenski, After Midnight
Tim O’Heir, Hedwig and the Angry Inch
Mick Potter, Les Miserables
winnerBrian Ronan, Beautiful – The Carole King Musical

Best Lighting Design of a Play
Paule Constable, The Cripple of Inishmaan
Jane Cox, Machinal
winnerNatasha Katz, The Glass Menagerie
Japhy Wideman, Of Mice and Men

Best Lighting Design of a Musical
winnerKevin Adams, Hedwig and the Angry Inch
Christopher Akerlind, Rocky
Howell Binkley, After Midnight
Donald Holder, The Bridges of Madison County

Best Direction of a Play
Tim Carroll, Twelfth Night
Michael Grandage, The Cripple of Inishmaan
winnerKenny Leon, A Raisin in the Sun
John Tiffany, The Glass Menagerie

Best Direction of a Musical
Warren Carlyle, After Midnight
Michael Mayer, Hedwig and the Angry Inch
Leigh Silverman, Violet
winnerDarko Tresnjak, A Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder

Special Tony Award for Lifetime Achievement in the Theatre
winnerJane Greenwood

Regional Theatre Award
winnerSignature Theatre

Isabelle Stevenson Award
winnerRosie O’Donnell

Tony Honors for Excellence in the Theatre
winnerJoseph P. Benincasa
winnerJoan Marcus
winnerCharlotte Wilcox

AWARDS SEASON 2014: Drama Desk Award Winners

Hedwig

The 2014 Drama Desk Award winners have been announced and there seems to be little contest about who was the best of the best this season.

Will the Tony Awards follow suit, or will we be surprised? Less than one week and we’ll find out!

Follow all of the awards coverage as we live blogtweetfacebook or view a summary of all things awards at The Broadway Musical Home.

The winners are marked below with winners.

Outstanding Musical
winnerA Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder
Aladdin
Beautiful: The Carole King Musical
Fun Home
Love’s Labour’s Lost
Rocky
The Bridges of Madison County

Outstanding Play
winnerRobert Schenkkan, All The Way
Nell Benjamin, The Explorers Club
Steven Levenson, Core Values
Conor McPherson, The Night Alive
Richard Nelson, Regular Singing
Bruce Norris, Domesticated
John Patrick Shanley, Outside Mullingar

Outstanding Revival of a Play
winnerTwelfth Night (Shakespeare’s Globe Production)
I Remember Mama
London Wall
No Man’s Land
Of Mice and Men
The Cripple of Inishmaan
The Model Apartment

Outstanding Revival of a Musical
winnerHedwig and the Angry Inch
Les Miserables
Violet

Outstanding Actor in a Play
winnerBryan Cranston, All The Way
Hamish Linklater, The Comedy of Errors
Ian McKellen, No Man’s Land
David Morse, The Unavoidable Disappearance of Tom Durnin
Chris O’Dowd, Of Mice and Men
Daniel Radcliffe, The Cripple of Inishmaan
Denzel Washington, A Raisin in the Sun

Outstanding Actress in a Play
winnerAudra McDonald, Lady Day at Emerson’s Bar and Grill
Barbara Andres, I Remember Mama
Tyne Daly, Mothers and Sons
Laurie Metcalf, Domesticated
J. Smith-Cameron, Juno and the Paycock
Harriet Walter, Julius Caesar

Outstanding Actor in a Musical
winnerNeil Patrick Harris, Hedwig and the Angry Inch
winnerJefferson Mays, A Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder
Adam Jacobs, Aladdin
Andy Karl, Rocky
Steven Pasquale, The Bridges of Madison County
Bryce Pinkham, A Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder

Outstanding Actress in a Musical
winnerJessie Mueller, Beautiful: The Carole King Musical
Sutton Foster, Violet
Idina Menzel, If/Then
Kelli O’Hara, The Bridges of Madison County
Margo Seibert, Tamar of the River
Barrett Wilbert Weed, Heathers: The Musical

Outstanding Featured Actor in a Play
winnerReed Birney, Casa Valentina
Chuck Cooper, Choir Boy
Peter Maloney, Outside Mullingar
Bobby Moreno, Year of the Rooster
Bill Pullman, The Jacksonian
Brian J. Smith, The Glass Menagerie

Outstanding Featured Actress in a Play
winnerCelia Keenan-Bolger, The Glass Menagerie
Betty Buckley, The Old Friends
Julia Coffey, London Wall
Diane Davis, The Model Apartment
Jan Maxwell, The Castle
Sophie Okonedo, A Raisin in the Sun

Outstanding Featured Actor in a Musical
winnerJames Monroe Iglehart, Aladdin
Danny Burstein, Cabaret
Nick Cordero, Bullets Over Broadway: The Musical
Joshua Henry, Violet
Rory O’Malley, Nobody Loves You
Bobby Steggert, Big Fish

Outstanding Featured Actress in a Musical
winnerAnika Larsen, Beautiful: The Carole King Musical
winnerLauren Worsham, A Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder
Stephanie J. Block, Little Miss Sunshine
Adriane Lenox, After Midnight
Sydney Lucas, Fun Home
Laura Osnes, The Threepenny Opera
Jennifer Simard, Disaster!

Outstanding Director of a Play
winnerTim Carroll, Twelfth Night
Joe Calarco, A Christmas Carol
Thomas Kail, Family Furniture
Bill Rauch, All The Way
Anna D. Shapiro, Domesticated
Julie Taymor, A Midsummer Night’s Dream

Outstanding Director of a Musical
winnerDarko Tresnjak, A Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder
Sam Gold, Fun Home
Michael Mayer, Hedwig and the Angry Inch
Bartlett Sher, The Bridges of Madison County
Susan Stroman, Bullets Over Broadway: The Musical
Alex Timbers, Rocky

Outstanding Choreography
winnerWarren Carlyle, After Midnight
Steven Hoggett, Kelly Devine, Rocky
Danny Mefford, Love’s Labour’s Lost
Casey Nicholaw, Aladdin
Susan Stroman, Bullets Over Broadway: The Musical
Sonya Tayeh, Kung Fu

Outstanding Music
winnerJason Robert Brown, The Bridges of Madison County
Andrew Lippa, Big Fish
Steven Lutvak, A Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder
Alan Menken, Aladdin
Kevin Murphy and Laurence O’Keefe, Heathers: The Musical
Jeanine Tesori, Fun Home

Outstanding Lyrics
winnerRobert L. Freedman and Steven Lutvak, A Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder
Howard Ashman, Tim Rice, and Chad Beguelin, Aladdin
Jason Robert Brown, The Bridges of Madison County
Michael Friedman, Love’s Labour’s Lost
Michael Korie, Far from Heaven
Lisa Kron, Fun Home

Outstanding Book of a Musical
winnerRobert L. Freedman, A Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder
Chad Beguelin, Aladdin
Joe Kinosian and Kellen Blair, Murder for Two
Lisa Kron, Fun Home
Douglas McGrath, Beautiful: The Carole King Musical
Marsha Norman, The Bridges of Madison County

Outstanding Orchestrations
winnerJason Robert Brown, The Bridges of Madison County
John Clancy, Fun Home
Larry Hochman, Big Fish
Steve Sidwell, Beautiful: The Carole King Musical
Michael Starobin, If/Then
Jonathan Tunick, A Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder

Outstanding Music in a Play
winnerNico Muhly, The Glass Menagerie
Lewis Flinn, The Tribute Artist
Elliot Goldenthal, A Midsummer Night’s Dream
Rob Kearns, The Life and Sort of Death of Eric Argyle
Tom Kochan, Almost, Maine
Duncan Sheik, A Man’s a Man

Outstanding Revue
winnerAfter Midnight
I’m a Stranger Here Myself: Musik from the Weimar and Beyond
Le Jazz Hot: How the French Saved Jazz
Til Divorce Do Us Part
What’s It All About? Bacharach Reimagined

Outstanding Set Design
winnerChristopher Barreca, Rocky
Alexander Dodge, A Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder
Richard Hoover, Small Engine Repair
Santo Loquasto, Bullets Over Broadway: The Musical
Ian MacNeil, A Doll’s House
Donyale Werle, The Explorers Club

Outstanding Costume Design
winnerWilliam Ivey Long, Bullets Over Broadway: The Musical
Constance Hoffman, A Midsummer Night’s Dream
Zane Pihlstrom, Nutcracker Rouge
Loren Shaw, The Mysteries
Jenny Tiramani, Twelfth Night
David C. Woolard, The Heir Apparent

Outstanding Lighting Design
winnerChristopher Akerlind, Rocky
Jane Cox, MachinalDavid Lander, The Civil War
Peter Mumford, King Lear
Brian Tovar, Tamar of the River
Japhy Weideman, Macbeth

Outstanding Projection Design
winnerAaron Rhyne, A Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder
Robert Massicotte and Alexis Laurence, Cirkopolis
Sven Ortel, A Midsummer Night’s Dream
Shawn Sagady, All The Way
Austin Switser, Sontag: Reborn Ben Rubin, Arguendo

Outstanding Sound Design in a Musical
winnerBrian Ronan, Beautiful: The Carole King Musical
Kai Harada, Fun Home
Peter Hylenski, Bullets Over Broadway: The Musical
Peter Hylenski, Rocky
Dan Moses Schreier, A Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder
Jon Weston, The Bridges of Madison County

Outstanding Sound Design in a Play
winnerMatt Tierney, Machinal
M.L. Dogg, The Open House
Katie Down, The Golden Dragon
Paul James Prendergast, All The Way
Dan Moses Schreier, Act One
Christopher Shutt, Love and Information

Outstanding Solo Performance
winnerJohn Douglas Thompson, Satchmo at the Waldorf
David Barlow, This is My Office
Jim Brochu, Character Man
Hannah Cabell, Grounded
Debra Jo Rupp, Becoming Dr. Ruth
Ruben Santiago-Hudson, August Wilson’s How I Learned What I Learned

Unique Theatrical Experience
winnerCirkopolis
Charlatan
Mother Africa
Nothing to Hide
Nutcracker Rouge
The Complete and Condensed Stage Directions of Eugene O’Neill Vol. 2

Special Awards:

winnerSoho Rep: For nearly four decades of artistic distinction, innovative production, and provocative play selection.

winnerVeanne Cox: For her ability to express the eccentricities, strengths, and vulnerabilities of a range of characters, and notably for her comedic flair as evidenced in this season’s The Old Friends and The Most Deserving.

winnerEd Sylvanus Iskandar, the Sam Norkin Off-Broadway Award: For his visionary directorial excellence. This season’s The Golden Dragon and The Mysteries exemplify his bold and strikingly original imagination.

winnerTo the ensembles of Off-Broadway’s The Open House and Broadway’s The Realistic Joneses and to the creator of both plays, Will Eno: For two extraordinary casts and one impressively inventive playwright.

winnerThe Open House: Hannah Bos, Michael Countryman, Peter Friedman Danny McCarthy, and Carolyn McCormick

winnerThe Realistic Joneses: Toni Collette, Michael C. Hall, Tracy Letts and Marisa Tomei

A few notes from the Drama Desk: As the current revival of Cabaret replicates the 1998 production, the Board deemed the show ineligible in the Outstanding Revival of a Musical category, as were performers, creative team members, and technical personnel associated with the earlier incarnation in their respective categories. Soul Doctor was considered for its Off-Broadway production in the 2012-13 season. Under Drama Desk rules, only new elements in its transfer to Broadway were eligible this season. Finally, Billy Crystal’s 700 Sundays was deemed ineligible because it was a return engagement of the 2005 Drama Desk winning show.

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