The Broadway Musical Blog – Musical theater news and gossip from the Great White Way

Dishing out daily (or almost daily) Broadway musical news and gossip. The companion site to The Broadway Musical Home (broadwaymusicalhome.com), a directory of Broadway musicals with the story, songs, merchandise, video clips, lyrics, tickets, rights & awards for almost 200 shows.

Archive for April, 2010

The reviews for Million Dollar Quartet are in…

Million Dollar Quartet, the Chicago transfer about a recording session featuring Elvis Presley, Johnny Cash, Jerry Lee Lewis and Carl Perkins, opened on Broadway last night and the critics were slightly split, but generally positive. Yes, they admit, the show does have elements of past jukebox musicals, but an amazing score and the fantastic musical skills of the actors portraying these personalities set it apart from the fray and will keep audiences coming for a good long time.

The New York Times

The prime asset of “Million Dollar Quartet,” written by Colin Escott and Floyd Mutrux and directed by Eric Schaeffer, is the explosive vitality of the music making…. Gifted musicians and likable performers, they tackle with no apparent discomfort the unenviable chore of impersonating some of the most revered names in pop music, from their slick pompadours right down to their frisky, agile fingertips. Read the full review.

The Hollywood Reporter

Bottom Line: Good rockin’ tonight, indeed…. This wildly entertaining show wonderfully captures the spirit of these seminal figures who would go on to change the course of popular music…. The four actor-musicians deliver rousing versions of nearly two dozen classic songs. Yes, the evening occasionally borders on becoming another “Legends in Concert,” but the terrific musicianship and incisive characterizations on display offset the Vegas-style atmosphere of the proceedings. Read the full review.

Backstage

When the curtain call is the most exciting part of a show, it’s definitely a problem. Such is the case with “Million Dollar Quartet,” the latest attempt to turn pop nostalgia into Broadway box-office gold…. This jukebox musical attempts to spin a showbiz anecdote about larger-than-life figures at a recording session into a full-blown theatrical experience…. Judging by the show’s success in Chicago, where it has been playing for over a year, the audience for “Million Dollar Quartet” is probably more interested in hearing the hits of their youth than in experiencing a solid dramatic arc, so look for it to make at least the title sum from the Broadway and inevitable touring productions. Read the full review.

Entertainment Weekly

The big question about this latest jukebox musical concerns whether it is really a Broadway show in any real dramatic sense, or just a way to squeeze money from the back catalogs of four rock superstars…. The vocal performances are mostly impressive, particularly as the four instrument-playing impersonators act as their own on-stage orchestra…. The trouble begins when the singing stops. Read the full review.

Delays, transfers, replacements, closings and even some happy news!

That’s right, it’s time for another massive news roundup. There’s a lot to catch up on, so without any further ado, here we go…

The Broadway premiere of Andrew Lloyd Webber’s Love Never Dies will open at the Neil Simon Theater in the spring of 2011 due to some health complications of ALW’s part. The show, which was to open on Broadway in November of 2011, has been playing to somewhat mixed reviews on the West End. The big buzz about the delay is in regards to Jack O’Brien (director) and Jerry Mitchell (choreographer) because…

Catch Me If You Can is officially opening on Broadway in the spring of 2011! Producers Hal Luftig and Margo Lion have confirmed that rehearsals for the show that premiered at Seattle’s 5th Avenue will begin in January. A theatre and the exact dates of production have not yet been announced, but O’Brien and Mitchell are on board, and it is assumed that the big names associated with the production (Aaron Tveit, Tom Wopat, Norbert Leo Butz) will be headliners.

Another exciting transfer is that of Yank!, the Off-Broadway hit that just closed at the York Theater Company. Producers Pamela Koslow and Karl Held have announced plans to bring the ‘don’t ask, don’t tell’ G.I. musical to the Great White Way during the 2010-11 season. No news as to whether Bobby Steggert and Ivan Hernandez will repeat the roles they originated on Broadway.

Another Off-Broadway hit, Sherie Rene Scott’s Everyday Rapture is headed to Broadway thanks to Megan Mullally’s sudden and late departure from Lips Together, Teeth Apart. Everyday Rapture will open on April 29, 2010, so it will be in the running for this year’s Tony Awards.

The other sudden departure was that of the show All About Me, which, after being panned harshly by critics, ended its Broadway run after only 20 performances. That, ladies and gentlemen, is what we call a flop.

But enough depressing news…here’s some happy news:

  • Next to Normal officially recouped its investment!
  • Henry Miller’s Theatre was renamed in Stephen Sondheim’s honor!
  • John Cameron Mitchell’s Hedwig and the Angry Inch may be headed to Broadway in the fall!

And yes, it’s not technically Broadway, but since so many Off-Broadway shows are transferring these days, I thought it worth mentioning that Bloody Bloddy Andrew Jackson, a new musical about the guy you talked about in history class is generating nothing but great buzz. If you want to see it while the price is right, get over to the Public Theatre ASAP.

The reviews for the Addams Family are in…

The reviews for The Addams Family are in…and the critics were nonplussed that a production starring Nathan Lane and Bebe Neuwirth could fail so completely. Lacking memorable songs and containing humorless jokes, buzz about the show was slightly on the negative side before opening, but ouch! Just read what they had to say:

New York Times Review

Imagine, if you dare, the agonies of the talented people trapped inside the collapsing tomb called “The Addams Family.” Being in this genuinely ghastly musical — which opened Thursday night at the Lunt-Fontanne Theater and stars a shamefully squandered Nathan Lane and Bebe Neuwirth — must feel like going to a Halloween party in a strait-jacket or a suit of armor. Sure, you make a flashy (if obvious) first impression. But then you’re stuck in the darn thing for the rest of the night, and it’s really, really uncomfortable. Why, you can barely move, and a strangled voice inside you keeps gasping, “He-e-e-lp! Get me out of here!”… A tepid goulash of vaudeville song-and-dance routines, Borscht Belt jokes, stingless sitcom zingers and homey romantic plotlines that were mossy in the age of “Father Knows Best,” “The Addams Family” is most distinctive for its wholesale inability to hold on to a consistent tone or an internal logic. Read the full review.

Wall Street Journal Review

If you’re a New Yorker with children, or if you’re bringing the family to Manhattan this summer, you’ll have to go to “The Addams Family.” It won’t kill you. You’ll laugh a lot, though never during the unmemorable songs, which are supposed to be funny but aren’t. You’re more than likely to spend a considerable part of the evening wondering how much the set cost. And as you depart the theater, you’ll probably catch yourself wondering whether it was really, truly worth it to take your kids to a goodish musical whose tickets are so expensive that you can buy an iPad for less than the price of four orchestra seats. Read the full review.

Variety Review

“The Addams Family” — the 1960s sitcom, that is — was famously kooky, spooky and altogether ooky. The new Broadway musical, based not on the sitcom but on assorted one-panel cartoons drawn over the years by the New Yorker’s Charles Addams, is kooky but not spooky or ooky; nor is it neat, sweet or petite (as the song goes). What this “Addams Family” has is the gloweringly perfect Nathan Lane, who gamely thrusts Gomez’s rapier at anything — or any joke — that moves. But $16.5 million has brought forth an ill-formed one-dimensional cartoon with lines and shading not quite inked in. Read the full review.

Hollywood Reporter Review

Bottom Line: Even the talents of Nathan Lane and Bebe Neuwirth can’t make this musical adaptation of the familiar property more than just ho-hum. Read the full review.

The Faster Times Review

Everything about the beginning of “The Addams Family: A New Musical”…promises a familiar, funny, even exciting night at the theater. Why, I wondered, did this terrific show get such terrible word-of-mouth? As “The Addams Family” progressed, however, my reaction changed. I experienced what might be called the six stages of musical mortification: excitement, expectation, impatience, disbelief, distraction, disappointment. When, shortly after the beginning of Act II, Uncle Fester asks the audience directly “What happens now? Can this be repaired? Or do you all leave in an hour feeling vaguely depressed?” he was not just talking about the complications in the story up to that point. Unintentionally or as an inside joke, he was also referring to the musical itself. Read the full review.

Do you think the show deserved to get so exhaustively panned?

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 25,685 other followers