The Reviews for On the Twentieth Century are In…

on-the-20th-century

The reviews for On the Twentieth Century are in, and the critics are happy to have been invited aboard for the ride.  There’s a charming simplicity to this musical – sign the star before the train’s 16-hour trip to NYC is finished – which is made all the more compelling by the virtuous vocal performances, the fast-paced plot movement, and the stunning look and feel.  Andy Karl and Mary Louise Wilson shine in their character-role performances, but it’s Kristin Chenoweth and Peter Gallagher who really steal the show…especially Chenoweth.  If you’ve forgotten while she’s been on TV and in the movies, her abilities are top-tier and on full display as the film star Lily Garland.  Overall, the critics’ message resounds as clearly as a train whistle pulling into Grand Central – there’s no one who won’t love On the Twentieth Century.

NEW YORK TIMES

In the theater, there is overacting, which is common and painful to watch. Then there’s over-the-moon acting, which is rare and occupies its own special cloud land in heaven. I am delighted to report that this latter art is being practiced in altitudinous-high style at the American Airlines Theater, where Kristin

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NEW YORK DAILY NEWS

Next stop, Broadway musical bliss. That’s where the Roundabout revival of “On the Twentieth Century,” directed with verve by Scott Ellis, takes you. The setting for this fast-paced, flab-free screwball operetta by Cy Coleman, Betty Comden and Adolph Green is a luxury coach en route from Chicago to New York in the… 

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NEW YORK POST

“They don’t write dialogue like this anymore,” a producer says, leafing through the Bible in “On the Twentieth Century.” And they don’t write musical comedies like this anymore, either. Gloriously revived by the Roundabout Theatre Company, this 1978 musical — now with sparkling turns by Kristin Chenoweth and Pete… 

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HOLLYWOOD REPORTER

At the top of Act II in “On the Twentieth Century,” four tap-dancing redcap Pullman porters work overtime to funnel syncopated energy into the facile analogy of “Life is Like a Train.” But this strained farce set in 1932 aboard the luxury Chicago-to-New York express passenger service is a musical stubbornly lacki… 

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