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The Reviews for ANASTASIA are In…

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Photo by Matthew Murphy

The reviews for Anastasia are in, and it’s not the dark and dangerous story that’s got critics leaving with frowns…it’s the unrealized production that struggles to tell it. It’s a tell-tale sign of dissatisfaction when an audience member can only comment on the “gorgeous costumes” and “picturesque scenery” when they leave the theatre, and that’s just what we’re hearing from the critics. Between the lackluster book and music (excepting songs directly adapted from the 1997 animated movie) and hard-working actors striving dutifully to portray underdeveloped characters, the new musical leaves little more to commend. Families may find magic in the newest Broadway arrival, but unfortunately this epic tale isn’t likely to make for a compelling “Journey to the Past” for many more seasoned theatregoers.

NEW YORK TIMES REVIEW OF ANASTASIA

The amnesiac title character of “Anastasia,” who may or may not be the long-lost daughter of the last Russian czar, isn’t alone in suffering a serious identity crisis. The postcard-scenic show that bears her name, which opened on Monday night at the Broadhurst Theater, has its own troubling case of multiple personality disorder…
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ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY REVIEW OF ANASTASIA

Released in 1997, Anastasia was a dazzling 94-minute animated movie musical. Twenty years later, it’s a fidget-inducing, two-and-a-half-hour Broadway musical, with a production not nearly animated enough to warrant that running time…
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ACCESS ATLANTA REVIEW OF ANASTASIA

Broadway musicals often feature heroines trying to find themselves, but perhaps never as literally as in Anastasia. In 1927 Leningrad, the scrappy, strapping Dmitry (Derek Klena) and the worldly, roguish Vlad (John Bolton) devise a scheme to pass off a street sweeper, Anya (Christy Altomare), as the Grand Duchess Anastasia…
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AM NEW YORK REVIEW OF ANASTASIA

Combine early 20th-century Russian history with bits and pieces of “Les Miz,” “My Fair Lady” and “Newsies,” and you’ve got “Anastasia,” the uneven but well-meaning and mostly pleasant new Broadway musical based on the 1997 animated film of the same title from 20th Century Fox.
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NBC NEW YORK REVIEW OF ANASTASIA

Broadway’s got a bright new star, and her name is “Anastasia.” The 1997 beloved animated movie has been transformed into a magical new stage musical, now open at the Broadhurst Theatre, with a much-improved book by Terrence McNally, added songs from the film’s composers Stephen Flaherty and Lynn Ahrens, and a star-making perform…
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