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The Reviews for Finding Neverland are In…

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Photo by Sara Krulwich

Finding Neverland opened and it seems lovers of Peter Pan and Glee will cheer, but lovers of creative musical theatre will hiss.  You know the story, and you know the names of the actors playing the biggest roles – Matthew Morrison (of Glee fame) and Kelsey Grammer.  So what’s not to love?  Unfortunately, the production begins and ends with what you already know.  Though the story of Peter Pan would seemingly burst at the seams with imaginative possibilities, this production stops short of exploring them. The critics report that performances feel lackluster, the book and music feel boring and sometimes stale, and the passion just doesn’t quite feel present. So there it is again – if you love Peter Pan and wouldn’t dream of missing a new version, the Lunt-Fontanne Theater is your spot.  Otherwise, you might be better served crossing this one off your list.

NEW YORK TIMES REVIEW

The first entrance applause occurs before even the overture begins. Riotous clapping is occasioned when a bright point of light travels over the ceiling and the curtain of the Lunt-Fontanne Theater in New York, where the push-button, button-pushing musical “Finding Neverland” opened on Wednesday night. This little 

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TIME OUT NEW YORK REVIEW

Manic, childish applause might cure the poisoned fairy Tinker Bell, but it’s not medicine enough for “Finding Neverland,” the awkward, garish and manipulative musical based on the 2004 Miramax film about playwright J.M. Barrie and the boys who inspired Peter Pan. Show-doctored into a state of shrill mediocrity 

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HOLLYWOOD REPORTER REVIEW

It had enough admirers to snag several Oscar nominations, including best picture, but I confess I found the 2004 movie “Finding Neverland” a decorous yawn, starring a somnambulant Johnny Depp opposite Kate Winslet in a role that under-utilized her talents. But the preciousness and mawkish emotional manipulation … 

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VULTURE REVIEW

Provenance is a concept usually associated with art, not theater. Who, after all, owns a plot — or the history on which it is based? Still, the problem rears up in several ways in “Finding Neverland,” the new musical starring Matthew Morrison as J.M. Barrie, the author of “Peter Pan.” This is not the first Broadway … 

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NBC NEW YORK REVIEW

I’m sorry “Finding Neverland” has finally opened—you can catch it now at the Lunt-Fontanne—because the behind-the-scenes tinkering has made for such riveting headlines: Harvey replaces creative team! Harvey axes leading man! Harvey fires publicist! Harvey, being Miramax chief Harvey Weinstein, may be a fledgling

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